Tag Archives: childrens stories

Monday Coffee

…or should I say tea? After all, we are meeting at tea time and the weather demands something a bit more comforting than coffee. Join me on the yellow sofa and let’s catch up. Continue reading

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The Adventurous Four: Search for the Amoulean Staff

If you would like to read this story from the beginning, click here.

CHAPTER THREE Continue reading

Book Tuesday

Welcome to Book Tuesday.  Continue reading

Sunday, December 2016

Hello,

I’m so glad I have an opportunity to write to you after a manic November. As successful as it was, the pace made me question whether I would make it to the end. I did though and am pleased to announce that a high number of the children taking part in the NaNoWriMo Challenge for 2016 met their word targets and surpassed them considerably.  Students that participated last year took it upon themselves to really challenge their abilities and their stories have shown what one year’s education can do for them. The plans were stronger and more efficient, their writing was of a higher standard and I’m pleased to say they are actually looking at their edits and correcting them, compared to the tears and tantrums I had to deal with this time last year.

For the younger students, it was a baptism by fire! Some thought it was just another fairy story without a strong middle or a relevant end. After making them sit down and read their stories out to their friends at Library Club, they soon realised that a storyteller has to have much more than pretty pink dresses and matching pink sparkly shoes to make his or her story interesting.  It was a fantastic way for them to work on their stories too, as one child found out that her story had a huge gap and mixed characters, a flaw her audience refused to accept.  After looking at me with woeful eyes, I suggested she ask her friends to help her fill in the gaps and they gladly skipped off to work the story map again and find a solution to the problem.  Hopefully, this will give them the tools to use in class to finish their work in the same way. Check your work, edit out the mistakes and check it again, just in case.  They’ll probably detest the sight of me by the end of January next year as I am determined to make them have more responsibility over the stories they submit for the Children’s Anthology.

My youngest writers surprised me. Their determination to finish and be a part of the process was amazing and I’m incredibly proud of them. Once all the stories are edited and checked again for improvements, I will be busy putting them together into the anthology which will be available for the parents to purchase and of course, I will keep a book or two in our school library for the children to read.

The proudest moment I had out of this whole process was when I read a story written by a year 5 student and was blown away by the style and structure of the story.  It was a typical zombie story but the style was similar to the horror genre on the market at the moment.  I started to get the feeling that maybe, just maybe, she had copied that style and even the storyline.  So, I decided to question said writer about how she managed to get such a good script written and who was her inspiration. She shocked me by telling me it came from a story she had read in the Children’s Anthology I created from last year’s writers! Of course, I wracked my brain trying to think of who had written a decent tale of zombies to inspire another writer to such an extent.  The real surprise was when she pointed out it was a story written by my daughter called Live or Die! That pretty much made my day. She is currently looking over her story and working ways of improving the end part which wasn’t as strong as the start, but still very good.

From aliens, to many many visits to Candy Land, from princesses with Gobbins under bridges to foxes and witches, the children have created their own special worlds where readers can lose themselves and go on a magical ride, thanks to their hard work and perseverance.

A special thank you to all the parents who take an interest in their children’s writing – you don’t know what a huge impact you are making on your children just by listening to their stories or sparing a moment to help them overcome the monsters and find solutions to how the princess will find her shoes again.  These children will have more confidence because of your time and energy in helping them, so thank you.

Making waves into oceans

Setting dreams into motion.

Mello-Elo

Book Tuesday: Just So Stories

Welcome to Book Tuesday.

First, let me start by apologising for missing last week.  If you follow my blog regularly, you will know that I am currently in the process of selling my house, so everything is a bit topsy turvy at the moment.

To make up for it, I thought we could discuss the wonderful Rudyard Kipling’s collection of Just So Stories this week.  I am a keen collector of old books and stumbled upon a copy of Mr Kipling’s book in a tiny bookshop hidden at the back of a Garden Centre.  The little shop stocks all sorts of memorabilia from time past, including a wonderful array of encyclopedias (outdated now of course).  My attention was drawn back to the book recently because we were covering the stories in the school where I work.  It gave me great pleasure to hear my daughter explain a Just So story to me and declare her favourite!

220px-JustSoStories

Rudyard Kipling wrote the collection of stories about how the modification of certain animals came about by man or some magical force for his eldest daughter Effie and illustrated the first version of the book.

When the first three were published in a children’s magazine, a year before Effie’s death, Kipling explained: ″…in the evening there were stories meant to put Effie to sleep, and you were not allowed to alter those by one single little word. They had to be told just so; or Effie would wake up and put back the missing sentence. So at last they came to be like charms, all three of them,—the whale tale, the camel tale, and the rhinoceros tale.”

My favourite story from the collection would have to be How The Camel Got His Hump.  I have managed to find a copy on the internet with illustrations from Mr Kipling and couldn’t resist sharing it with you.  It’s not a very long story, but definitely a worthwhile read.

HOW THE CAMEL GOT HIS HUMP

OW this is the next tale, and it tells how the Camel got his big hump.

In the beginning of years, when the world was so new and all, and the Animals were just beginning to work for Man, there was a Camel, and he lived in the middle of a Howling Desert because he did not want to work; and besides, he was a Howler himself. So he ate sticks and thorns and tamarisks and milkweed and prickles, most ‘scruciating idle; and when anybody spoke to him he said ‘Humph!’ Just ‘Humph!’ and no more.

Presently the Horse came to him on Monday morning, with a saddle on his back and a bit in his mouth, and said, ‘Camel, O Camel, come out and trot like the rest of us.’

‘Humph!’ said the Camel; and the Horse went away and told the Man.

Presently the Dog came to him, with a stick in his mouth, and said, ‘Camel, O Camel, come and fetch and carry like the rest of us.’

‘Humph!’ said the Camel; and the Dog went away and told the Man.

Presently the Ox came to him, with the yoke on his neck and said, ‘Camel, O Camel, come and plough like the rest of us.’

‘Humph!’ said the Camel; and the Ox went away and told the Man.

At the end of the day the Man called the Horse and the Dog and the Ox together, and said, ‘Three, O Three, I’m very sorry for you (with the world so new-and-all); but that Humph-thing in the Desert can’t work, or he would have been here by now, so I am going to leave him alone, and you must work double-time to make up for it.’

That made the Three very angry (with the world so new-and-all), and they held a palaver, and an indaba, and a punchayet, and a pow-wow on the edge of the Desert; and the Camel came chewing on milkweed most ‘scruciating idle, and laughed at them. Then he said ‘Humph!’ and went away again.

Presently there came along the Djinn in charge of All Deserts, rolling in a cloud of dust (Djinns always travel that way because it is Magic), and he stopped to palaver and pow-pow with the Three.

‘Djinn of All Deserts,’ said the Horse, ‘is it right for any one to be idle, with the world so new-and-all?’

‘Certainly not,’ said the Djinn.

‘Well,’ said the Horse, ‘there’s a thing in the middle of your Howling Desert (and he’s a Howler himself) with a long neck and long legs, and he hasn’t done a stroke of work since Monday morning. He won’t trot.’

‘Whew!’ said the Djinn, whistling, ‘that’s my Camel, for all the gold in Arabia! What does he say about it?’

‘He says “Humph!”‘ said the Dog; ‘and he won’t fetch and carry.’

‘Does he say anything else?’

‘Only “Humph!”; and he won’t plough,’ said the Ox.

‘Very good,’ said the Djinn. ‘I’ll humph him if you will kindly wait a minute.’

The Djinn rolled himself up in his dust-cloak, and took a bearing across the desert, and found the Camel most ‘scruciatingly idle, looking at his own reflection in a pool of water.

‘My long and bubbling friend,’ said the Djinn, ‘what’s this I hear of your doing no work, with the world so new-and-all?’

‘Humph!’ said the Camel.

The Djinn sat down, with his chin in his hand, and began to think a Great Magic, while the Camel looked at his own reflection in the pool of water.

THIS is the picture of the Djinn making the beginnings of the Magic that brought the Humph to the Camel. First he drew a line in the air with his finger, and it became solid: and then he made a cloud, and then he made an egg–you can see them both at the bottom of the picture– and then there was a magic pumpkin that turned into a big white flame. Then the Djinn took his magic fan and fanned that flame till the flame turned into a magic by itself. It was a good Magic and a very kind Magic really, though it had to give the Camel a Humph because the Camel was lazy. The Djinn in charge of All Deserts was one of the nicest of the Djinns, so he would never do anything really unkind.

‘You’ve given the Three extra work ever since Monday morning, all on account of your ‘scruciating idleness,’ said the Djinn; and he went on thinking Magics, with his chin in his hand.

‘Humph!’ said the Camel.

‘I shouldn’t say that again if I were you,’ said the Djinn; ‘you might say it once too often. Bubbles, I want you to work.’

And the Camel said ‘Humph!’ again; but no sooner had he said it than he saw his back, that he was so proud of, puffing up and puffing up into a great big lolloping humph.

HERE is the picture of the Djinn in charge of All Deserts guiding the Magic with his magic fan. The camel is eating a twig of acacia, and he has just finished saying “humph” once too often (the Djinn told him he would), and so the Humph is coming. The long towelly-thing growing out of the thing like an onion is the Magic, and you can see the Humph on its shoulder. The Humph fits on the flat part of the Camel’s back. The Camel is too busy looking at his own beautiful self in the pool of water to know what is going to happen to him.

Underneath the truly picture is a picture of the World-so-new-and-all. There are two smoky volcanoes in it, some other mountains and some stones and a lake and a black island and a twisty river and a lot of other things, as well as a Noah’s Ark. I couldn’t draw all the deserts that the Djinn was in charge of, so I only drew one, but it is a most deserty desert.

‘Do you see that?’ said the Djinn. ‘That’s your very own humph that you’ve brought upon your very own self by not working. To-day is Thursday, and you’ve done no work since Monday, when the work began. Now you are going to work.’

‘How can I,’ said the Camel, ‘with this humph on my back?’

‘That’s made a-purpose,’ said the Djinn, ‘all because you missed those three days. You will be able to work now for three days without eating, because you can live on your humph; and don’t you ever say I never did anything for you. Come out of the Desert and go to the Three, and behave. Humph yourself!’

And the Camel humphed himself, humph and all, and went away to join the Three. And from that day to this the Camel always wears a humph (we call it ‘hump’ now, not to hurt his feelings); but he has never yet caught up with the three days that he missed at the beginning of the world, and he has never yet learned how to behave.

*************

I do hope you enjoy the Just So Story.  Do leave a comment and tell me which story is your favourite.

Thanks for reading.

Monday Coffee

  Phew! I made it!  There was so much to do today  and I’ve only just settled the sprogs in the last hour, which is really late for them.  

I see Chris is here with Todd and everyone is giving a round of applause to AMommasView for her Liebster Award Nomination. Congratulations! 

Whilst everyone is chatting, shall we order? Have you had something already?  What’s the favourite of the day?  I heard the ginger and cinnamon drink is quite nice.  I can’t say I’m brave enough to try it. Tonight calls for a lovely hazel nut hot chocolate.  Will you join me?  

How was your weekend?  Mine went really well and I did wear the dress!  If you’re wondering what I’m talking about, I’ll remind you here whilst we wait for our drinks.  As promised, here is a pic of me in the dress.  I’ve chosen one with the Hubble whilst we were dancing.

  The things I had to do to get into that dress will remain a secret! It was a lovely event and it was wonderful to catch up with family and friends after so long.

How is the hot chocolate?  While you sip yours, tell me, how was your weekend?  What did you get up to?

Oh, before I forget, I’m really excited about an event happening at my school this week. I’ve organised a visit from Rob Lewis, a fantastic children’s author. He is doing what I hope to do one day – visiting schools and sharing his work with the students. Are you brave enough to face a hall full of children waiting for you to entertain them with your stories? I think it would be a wonderful experience.

On the writing front, are you prepping for the final push before NaNoWriMo and the end of the year?  I’m so glad to see more of my blogging friends joining up.  I haven’t as yet, but I’m not too concerned as I joined in a week late last year and still managed to finish.  It’s finding the right storyline that concerns me.  

Is anyone trying to finish their novel in time for the Christmas rush?  I have given up on putting a time limit on my projects as life keeps interrupting my work.  Once things settle I am going to get stricter with my timing on other things to keep more focused on my writing. Wait…where have I heard that before?  Oh right…me – a couple of months ago!  There’s no hope!

How do you keep up with work, life, children and extra activities plus writing?  Please, tips would be welcome!

Right, it looks like more customers are coming in and I have to run home now.  Thanks for the chat and sharing a hazel nut hot chocolate with me.  Same time next week?  I’ll see you then. 😀

Book Tuesday: Cecil the Bully – Chapter Eight

If you’re like me and tend to miss updates on stories, here is a link to the previous chapter of Cecil the Bully – Chapter Seven.

Now, continuing on from poor Thomas shaking and shivering at the thought of Ms Crow’s undivided attention on him… Continue reading

Book Tuesday: Cecil the Bully – Chapter Four

If you are just joining us, please follow the story from Chapter One, Chapter Two and Chapter Three by clicking on the chapters highlighted.

CHAPTER FOUR

“This is BBC Berkshire with the news at six. Pictures have appeared in Rave News showing our local MP, Mr Craven, sporting a new type of hat on his head! When asked if this was to hide his baldness for the upcoming elections, he attacked the reporter and screamed that he could not remove the hat, even if he wanted to! More on this story later. Continue reading

Book Tuesday: Cecil the Bully – Chapter Three

Just in case you have missed out, click on Chapter One and Chapter Two to catch up!

CHAPTER THREE

The melody of Moonlit Sonata drifted through the classrooms as the children lined up. It was the last day of school and they barely contain their excitement. Mrs Swansey shushed her Year 2 class as she led the way to the hall. They giggled and tittered, whispering about their Easter Sticky creations. Thirty pairs of curious eyes stared at the adults standing at the front of the stage in the brightly lit hall. A tall man with a shiny bald head was busy examining the tables laid out with the competition entries. Next to him was a scruffy looking younger man who held a camera and click clicked it at the Easter hats, pretty Easter gardens and Easter eggs of various sizes and shapes. Continue reading

Book Tuesday Apology

My humblest apologies to all my readers awaiting the next instalment of Cecil the Bully. I have been occupied with caring for my mum in hospital and have not sat down long enough to draft out the next chapter. I will be back on schedule next week.

Please join me then for Chapter 3 of Cecil The Bully –

What plans do Cecil and his minions have for the visiting MP and his entourage? Will the monstrous mobsters mobilise mayhem at their motivating assembly? Find out next week!