Tag Archives: childrens stories

Smorgasbord Book Reviews by Sally Cronin – #Children’s – Space Dust by Eloise de Sousa

I’m over the moon to receive another wonderful review for Space Dust. Sally has recommended this little story as a great Christmas gift. I hope you’ll agree.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Delighted to share my review for the latest children’s book by Eloise de Sousa.. Space Dust which is available in print.

About Space Dust

We’re going on a trip in Big Ox’s canoe. Watch the fire bears roar on Venus as pepper pot trees grow on the moon. As Big Ox steers us to the planets, Litte One wonders if Mum will come home soon.

My review for Space Dust

A wonderful journey around the planets in a canoe paddled by a favourite spoon that will delight younger readers, and those reading the story to them. There are beautifully colourful illustrations between the stages of the trip, which will encourage a pause in the storytelling, offering an opportunity to discuss the journey so far. The two main characters, Big Ox and Little One are lovable travel companions as they head off in search of Little One’s mum. and discover creatures…

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Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves -#Childrens – Space Dust by Eloise De Sousa

Let’s continue our space journey by visiting Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore, where she has kindly added Space Dust to her listings and promotions. Continue reading

Day Four – Reaching Elastic Limits with Space Dust

The time difference squirrels away at our estimated time of arrival but we will persevere to Howard’s blog space where special gifts await.

Watch this space…

…as we glide to a gentle stop where time and space meet. Join Big Ox and Little One as they visit The Elastic Limits at Howard Loring’s place. Click on the pic or his name to begin your journey.

Blast Off with Space Dust Blog Tour

It’s time! Let’s all climb aboard Big Ox’s canoe for a trip across the ether. Our mission: to spread the word about Space Dust’s debut and enjoy exploring the characters and extraordinary creatures they discover in the story.

So, grab the spoon and off we go up the rainbow ribbon trail to Lorraine Mace’s blog where we will stop for an interview and story share before sailing away to our next blog.

Keep your eyes peeled for free copies of the book along the way.

Let’s go! We’re off to Lorraine’s! Click on her book pic or name and away we go!

Monday Corrrfffeee!

It’s a beautiful day here in south east England and there’s a freshly boiled kettle waiting for us to fill our mugs. Join me in the garden for a coffee and catch up. Continue reading

Space Dust

It’s here! My blood, sweat and tears arrived today in the post and I’m so pleased with how it turned out.

The setting is as close to perfect as I can get it and my illustrations have come to life on the white, glossy pages. The true test, of course, will be whether the children engage with the book and if the story fires their imaginations. After testing it on my book club members and year Reception at school, I have optimistic hopes of getting them to love this story as much as I do.

Now the fun part: this story was written for the library service in my borough, inspired by their theme Space Chase. I didn’t want to write a generic book about racing through space and instead, took inspiration from the imaginings of the children as they gazed up at the moon. Is it made of cheese? Does it have alien trees?

Using these ideas and brainstorming with Mark Hickling, one of our teachers at my school, and my youngest sprog, a new concept was born. I created Little One – a character who could be a boy or girl, giving the story a gender neutral balance. Little One’s mum has gone away and, like most young children at some point in their lives, Little One feels as if the separation is for a long time. Big Ox, the adult in charge, decides to take Little One on an adventure to help his tiny friend cope with Mum’s absence. What better way to occupy the mind of a small person than take them in a canoe ride across space, using Big Ox’s absolute favourite spoon as an oar?

This space story aims to entertain young and old alike with various visions of space through eyes that aren’t jaded by time or a lack of imagination; instead it inspires silly questions and adventure.

If you’d like to order your copy of Space Dust, click on the pic below. It will take you to my author site with all my book titles available to purchase.

Thank you for stopping by.

Monday Coffee

…or should I say tea? After all, we are meeting at tea time and the weather demands something a bit more comforting than coffee. Join me on the yellow sofa and let’s catch up. Continue reading

The Adventurous Four: Search for the Amoulean Staff

If you would like to read this story from the beginning, click here.

CHAPTER THREE Continue reading

Book Tuesday

Welcome to Book Tuesday.  Continue reading

Sunday, December 2016

Hello,

I’m so glad I have an opportunity to write to you after a manic November. As successful as it was, the pace made me question whether I would make it to the end. I did though and am pleased to announce that a high number of the children taking part in the NaNoWriMo Challenge for 2016 met their word targets and surpassed them considerably.  Students that participated last year took it upon themselves to really challenge their abilities and their stories have shown what one year’s education can do for them. The plans were stronger and more efficient, their writing was of a higher standard and I’m pleased to say they are actually looking at their edits and correcting them, compared to the tears and tantrums I had to deal with this time last year.

For the younger students, it was a baptism by fire! Some thought it was just another fairy story without a strong middle or a relevant end. After making them sit down and read their stories out to their friends at Library Club, they soon realised that a storyteller has to have much more than pretty pink dresses and matching pink sparkly shoes to make his or her story interesting.  It was a fantastic way for them to work on their stories too, as one child found out that her story had a huge gap and mixed characters, a flaw her audience refused to accept.  After looking at me with woeful eyes, I suggested she ask her friends to help her fill in the gaps and they gladly skipped off to work the story map again and find a solution to the problem.  Hopefully, this will give them the tools to use in class to finish their work in the same way. Check your work, edit out the mistakes and check it again, just in case.  They’ll probably detest the sight of me by the end of January next year as I am determined to make them have more responsibility over the stories they submit for the Children’s Anthology.

My youngest writers surprised me. Their determination to finish and be a part of the process was amazing and I’m incredibly proud of them. Once all the stories are edited and checked again for improvements, I will be busy putting them together into the anthology which will be available for the parents to purchase and of course, I will keep a book or two in our school library for the children to read.

The proudest moment I had out of this whole process was when I read a story written by a year 5 student and was blown away by the style and structure of the story.  It was a typical zombie story but the style was similar to the horror genre on the market at the moment.  I started to get the feeling that maybe, just maybe, she had copied that style and even the storyline.  So, I decided to question said writer about how she managed to get such a good script written and who was her inspiration. She shocked me by telling me it came from a story she had read in the Children’s Anthology I created from last year’s writers! Of course, I wracked my brain trying to think of who had written a decent tale of zombies to inspire another writer to such an extent.  The real surprise was when she pointed out it was a story written by my daughter called Live or Die! That pretty much made my day. She is currently looking over her story and working ways of improving the end part which wasn’t as strong as the start, but still very good.

From aliens, to many many visits to Candy Land, from princesses with Gobbins under bridges to foxes and witches, the children have created their own special worlds where readers can lose themselves and go on a magical ride, thanks to their hard work and perseverance.

A special thank you to all the parents who take an interest in their children’s writing – you don’t know what a huge impact you are making on your children just by listening to their stories or sparing a moment to help them overcome the monsters and find solutions to how the princess will find her shoes again.  These children will have more confidence because of your time and energy in helping them, so thank you.

Making waves into oceans

Setting dreams into motion.

Mello-Elo